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Research

The main research areas at the Chair of Social Psychology can be clustered into three main topics:

 

  • Gender stereotypes and leadership: Here, for example, the effects of biological gender and masculine and feminine appearance on the attribution of leadership competence, failure-as-an-asset effects as well as backlash effects and their consequences are examined.
    Contact persons: Prof. Dr. Dagmar Stahlberg, Mona Salwender, M.Sc.

 

  • Language and people perception: The working group deals with the effects of accents and dialects on people's perception as well as with gendered language and its consequences.                                             
    Contact persons: Dr. Janin Rössel, Prof. Dr. Dagmar Stahlberg

 

  • Predictors and interventions in the context of physical and mental health: The aim is to investigate factors that can influence the experience and well-being of individuals. Among other things, the effects of self-compassion, humor, narcissism, emotion regulation, and motto goals (positive psychology) on various variables such as coping with everyday problems (e.g. examination anxiety), sleep quality, the impostor phenomenon, prosocial behavior, or the fulfilment of unpleasant tasks will be investigated.
    Contact persons: Dr. Sebastian Butz, Dr. Thomas Dyllick-Brenzinger, Dr. Janin Rössel, Prof. Dr. Dagmar Stahlberg

 

Details and further specific research topics can be found on the pages of the respective employees (Team).

 

In addition, there is more social psychological research to discover from all over the world: The project Experience Science by the chairs of Social Psychology aims at making these insights available to the broad public. In particular, science can be experienced via two routes: 1) via brief articles that present current social psychological research findings in an interesting as well as accessible manner, 2) via the opportunity to participate in current research studies, which are conducted online or on-site. Discover the contents at: www.forschung-erleben.de